Falfeg

Spear with Square tang.

Additional Info

  • Number: 042515
  • Dimensions: -
  • Material: Wood, Metal, Rattan
  • Year of Accession: 1905
  • Collector: Gustav Niederlein
  • Ethnic Group: Cordilleran
  • Functional Context: Rice Rituals, Headtaking

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Appaki Necklace

A necklace made out of Appaki seeds of a plant . This is commonly used in the villages in the Cordillera. Strings longer that this necklace is usually part of the Ifugao dukaw (this collection). Some communities continue to produce this necklace and have it sold in curio shops or during the annual cultural festivities. Contemporary necklace and bags are also produced using the appaki seeds.

Falfeg

Spear with Square tang.

Falfeg or Falfog

Spear with a single barbed steel point shaped like a fish tail. Spearhead was fastened to the wooden shaft. A basketry weave of rattan ferrule was used to strengthen the shaft where the square-shaped tang is secured. A cone shaped iron cap was placed on the base of the shaft to protect the spear when while it was used as a staff by men walking along the trails. Possibly a Bontoc falfeg.

Inabnutan

An ifugao man’s back pack used in long journeys including headtaking raids. Made out of hair like fibre of plant that serves at protection from rain. The Bontocs also have fangao which is similar to this. Possibly newly made before it was acquired.

Inabnutan

Ifugao man’s backpack used in long journeys including headtaking raids. Made out of hair like fibre of a plant that serves as protection from rain. The Bontocs also have fangao which are similar to this.

Kalasay

Wooden shield. Mound shaped and forked with three prongs atop and two prongs at it base. Rattan basketry was woven to help keep the wood together. Handle at the back was carved. With patina. Paper label stating that it was displayed at the St. Louis Fair is pasted at the back of the shield.

Kalasay

Wooden shield. Mound shaped and forked with three prongs atop and two prongs at it base. Rattan basketry was woven to help keep the wood together. Handle at the back was carved. With patina.

Kattagang

Woven headgear from the Pasil, Kalinga using dyed materials. The design and colour of this object is distinct to Kalinga communities. Man’s personal adornment which was also used as storage of personal items such as tobacco. It was worn further back on the head and secured with a tie across forehead. This was useful especially as men walked to the neighbouring villages or when they attend festivities. Similar designs can be found in Kalinga villages. Some elders still wear this during festivities or occasions.

Necklace

Necklace made out of beads.

Panilipo

Spear with a single barbed steel point shaped like a fish tail. Bigger sized spearhead was fastened to the wooden shaft. A basketry weave of rattan ferrule was used to strengthen the shaft where the tang is secured. The base was burned by incendiary bombs that hit the Linden-Museum during WW II. Possibly a Bontoc falfeg.

Panilipo

Spear with a single barbed steel point shaped like a fish tail. Bigger sized spearhead was fastened to the wooden shaft. A basketry weave of rattan ferrule was used to strengthen the shaft where the round tang is secured. The base was burned by incendiary bombs that hit the Linden-Museum during WW II. Possibly a Bontoc falfeg.

Pinnang

Axe with rattan weave ferrule and a wood shaft.

Pinnang

Axe with a steel ferrule and a wood shaft.

Suklong

Woven headgear using dyed materials. Man’s personal adornment which was also used as storage of personal items such as tobacco. It is worn further back on the head and secured with a tie across forehead. Several other designs can be found in the Bontoc – Kankanaey area. Some elders in Bontoc and nearby villages still wear the Suklong during festivities or occasions.

Tangkil

A man’s upper arm ornament made out of boar’s tusk. With basketry weave and rattan used to attach some strands of hair. Men wear a pair of this during ceremonies and rituals such as in the begnas ritual for the rice production. This material is now considered an heirloom. Materials are no longer available for its production. But nowadays, this ornament is popularly reproduced and worn during cultural festivals.

Tangkil

A man’s upper arm ornament made out of boar’s tusks. With a basketry weave and rattan tie. Men wear a pair of this during ceremonies and rituals such as in the begnas ritual for the rice production. This material is now considered an heirloom. Materials are no longer available for its production. But nowadays, this ornament is popularly reproduced and worn during cultural festivals.