Kopit

A small rattan woven container with cover. Baskets like this were used by men to store tobacco and other personal belongings. With patina.

Additional Info

  • Number: SA 35768
  • Dimensions: 18 x 14.3 x 9
  • Material: Rattan
  • Year of Accession: 1980
  • Collector: Christian Roll
  • Ethnic Group: Bontoc
  • Functional Context: Implements & Utensils, Containers

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

Agawin

A small container for collecting snails. Woven from rattan. Women would attach this to their belt with a tiny woven handle.

Buklut

Container for locust such as the dudun or chuchun (large edible locusts). Ifugaos during the first half of the 20th century trapped (using the butit or botet) and gathered locusts. There were cases when a swarm passes over the rice fields. It was the belief of the old folks in Ifugao that dudun caused famine, so they had to be contained. These objects are no longer made nowadays as the dudun infestation is no longer a problem.

Clay container

Clay pot container with wood cover and stand. With geometric designs similar to some designs of tattooing in Kalinga villages.

Container for catching birds

A basket container for catching birds. Open hexagonal plaiting type of rattan weave. During the summer months, young boys in some villages in Ifugao would go to the mountains and fields to catch birds such as the bud’ing or pfucheng ricebirds (munia birds). They use a stick with pu-ot sticky sap from trees such as jackfruit to catch the birds.

Gampa

Small version of the Ifugao gampa. Open basket made out of rattan. With rattan strip border and an attached handle. It is used as a tray e.g. for boiled sweet potato or taro.

Hapeeng

A rattan backpack with built-in opening. It was designed to allow flexibility in carrying loads when travelling long distance, mostly by foot. It was also used in storing personal belongings. Food, clothing and other personal belongings were stored or carried with this object. One of the several kinds of backpacks produced by Ifugaos. Containers of this kind are no longer popular in Ifugao as cloth and leather based commercial backpacks have gradually been introduced. Contemporary versions of this object are made nowadays for sale to tourists.

Hapeeng

A rattan woven backpack with cover and straps. It was designed to allow flexibility in carrying loads when travelling long distance, mostly by foot. It was also used in storing personal belongings. Food, clothing and other personal belongings were carried or stored with this object. One of the several backpacks produced by Ifugaos. Containers of this kind are no longer popular in Ifugao as several clothed and leather based commercial backbacks have gradually been introduced. Contemporary versions of this object are made nowadays for sale to tourists.

Hukup or Ho-op

Woven rattan and bamboo flat basket container with square base and outflaring corners. It has a fitting square cover. Used by the Ifugaos as food container primarily for cooked rice, and sweet potatoes. Collector notes that this “is used for carrying cooked rice to the fields”. Containers of this kind are rarely used nowadays in Ifugao households as many ceramic and plastic containers have gradually been introduced.

Jewelry container

A finely woven small container with cover. It is made by a combination of warp and weft rattan work. Used to store ornaments such as earrings and necklaces. Containers of this kind are rarely used nowadays in Ifugao households as the traditional jewellery is no longer produced and other jewellery types have gradually been introduced. Similar objects are still woven and sold to tourists.

Kopit

A small rattan woven container with cover. Baskets like this were used by men to store tobacco and other personal belongings. With patina.

Malukung food container

Wooden container for sago from Banaue, Ifugao. It is carved with a head of an animal (a turtle) at either end. Collector notes that this object is “nineteenth century”. Similar containers were used for food that has been cooked using the hibak (tuwali Ifugao) boiling method for meat, legumes and other vegetables. Containers of this kind are rarely used nowadays in Ifugao households as many ceramic, glass and plastic containers have gradually been introduced. Sometimes wood carvers make contemporary versions of this object for sale to tourists.

Meat Container

A wooden meat container with cover. The cover is designed with lizard, a species often depicted in woodcarving. Some Ifugao villages distinguish at least five kinds of lizards found inside the house and on the ground. The whole container is carved in the shape of a turtle. Before the WWII, meat was occasionally eaten, normally during rituals, celebrations or when hunters come home with a game. Pork and chicken are the preferred meat amongst the Ifugao and Bontoc.

Patiw

Wooden spice (e.g. chilli) container with cover from Ifugao. In the past, some households planted chilli in their backyards. Chilli is crushed and used in its raw form and it is often used by men to season meat dishes.

Seed Container

A bamboo container with rattan basketry weave around it. With a cover and braided handle. Some Ifugao villages store their rice seeds in bamboo and rattan containers. Over the years, the Ifugaos have planted many varieties of rice. They have observed the characteristics of each of these varieties s this was very important in the traditional rice production.

Sling bag

A small rattan sling bag, with cover and strap.

Tupil

Finely woven rattan container with cover and straps. Used to carry food and serve as a “lunch basket”. In some villages, this container was also used in storing legumes such as peas and mung beans.

Ulbong or Orpfong

Woven container with cover and braided handle used for storing husked or pounded rice (from the mortar and pestle). The based is made of coiled single flat piece of rattan. A lizard design was woven on to the outer part of the container. Before the introduction of plastic and ceramic rice bins, each house owned one of this. The container was primarily used to protect the rice from unwanted insects and kept the desired rice moisture and taste for days. Each household would store pounded rice so it will be ready for cooking. Containers like this are kept inside the Ifugao traditional house. It was a practice to keep this container filled with some rice contents.

Ulbong or Orpfong

Woven container with cover and braided handle used for storing ceremonial rice.

Ulbong or Orpfong

Woven container with cover. It was used for storing husked or pounded rice (from the mortar and pestle). Before the introduction of plastic and ceramic rice bins, each house owned one of this. The container was primarily used to protect the rice from unwanted insects and kept the desired rice moisture and taste for days. Each household would store pounded rice so it will be ready for cooking. Containers like this were kept inside the Ifugao traditional house. It was a practice to keep this container filled with some rice contents. In recent times in Ifugao and other parts of the Cordilleras, containers similar to this are woven and used as ceremonial gift to newly married couple.

Uppig

Finely woven rattan container with cover. Used to carry food and serve as a “lunch basket”.

Wooden container

Wooden container designed with a seated anthropomorphic figure.